Aug. 22, 2017
Providing additional feed is a relatively common practice throughout the summer months to boost gains on unproductive pastures. However, producers trying to “stretch the grass” by feeding suppleme...


Aug. 22, 2017
While certainly not a blessing, drought isn’t always a total loss. Kris Ringwall, extension beef specialist at North Dakota State University (NDSU), explains that tough times often result in the re-...


Aug. 15, 2017
If cows were born to eat grass, why are lactating dairy cows rarely fed grass forages? The answer, according to Pat Hoffman, is simply that as modern dairies have advanced in production, they h...


Aug. 15, 2017
The phrase, “Do it right or not at all,” speaks volumes to many. This sage advice passed down for generations can be applied to numerous situations — including fall forage establishment. Marvin...


Aug. 8, 2017
As critical drought conditions plague North Dakota, producers in Michigan are stepping in to lend a hand. North Dakota Department of Agriculture (NDDA) and the North Dakota State University&nbs...


Aug. 8, 2017
Soil health experts champion the idea of using cover crops for a variety of reasons. As defined by the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), cover crops control erosion, maintain soil health...


Aug. 1, 2017
There’s no question that soil health is key to the sustainability of a grazing operation. What is in question, however, is the actual effect of winter bale grazing on soil health. Simply put, many enthusiasts praise this method for adding nutrients immediately back into the soil through hay litter and manure, making the cost of hay seemingly irrelevant. However, no data has supported the claims that the benefits to soil outweigh the cost of hay at almost any...


Aug. 1, 2017
(From left) Jessica Jurcek, Kirsten Jurcek, and Weenonah BrattsetFor Kirsten Jurcek, operating a grass-fed and finished beef farm is sustainable not only to her family, but to the land as well. Jurcek runs Brattset Family Farm full time with the help of her mother, Weenonah, and daughter, Jessica. Weenonah bought the 183-acre farm outside of Jefferson, Wis., in 1968 and moved her children to Wisconsin while her husband, Harold, continued to work in Chicago as a firefighter...


July 25, 2017
When life gives you drought, make corn silage from your stressed grain crop. As dry conditions wear on in the Upper Plains, some producers are considering salvaging their corn cash crop as feed. “I...


July 25, 2017
Planning is especially vital for fall forage production. While yield may be higher if planted early, dry weather and pest pressure are limiting factors. The contrary is true for late fall planting. University of Arkansas researchers conducted a field trial to compare seven winter-annual forages for fall forage yield with early and late planting dates. Spring oat, winter oat, rye, wheat, triticale, ryegrass, and rape were tested at research centers in both Fayetteville...